Sunday, June 7, 2009

Bystander Intervention

How many times have you been at a party or with a small group of friends and witnessed something that made you feel uneasy? Maybe it was a man pressuring a woman to leave with him. Perhaps it was a sexist joke or comment. Or maybe you saw a friend slap his date. What would you do?

You might be thinking, "That's none of my business." You may feel like to say something would mean "sticking your nose in someone else's business."

IF YOU STAY SILENT, YOU ARE PART OF THE PROBLEM.

Sexual assault rarely happens in a room full of people. But warning signs or red flags that a situation is about to become abusive are often noticed by others. Stepping in to find out what's going on could prevent a sexual assault.

This doesn't mean that you have to get in a fight. It could be as simple as interrupting the situation (asking "where's the bathroom" could provide an opportunity for someone who is feeling cornered to slip away) or checking in with the person you're concerned about. It could mean telling a friend that you don't like the way s/he is acting, or it could mean calling the police.

The point is, if you see an abusive or potentially abusive situation DO SOMETHING!

It could change the course of someone's life forever.

University of Northern Colorado, "Be the Better Men"

1 comment:

buy viagra said...

all persons who are abused physically, sexually and emotionally should discuss their abuse with someone you trust to make up my mind so as soon as possible and report it!

What is Men Standing Up?

Moving to End Sexual Assault's Men's Prevention Education program in Boulder, Colorado is dedicated to raising awareness about rape prevention. Studies show that that men and boys hear a message about ending sexual violence better from other males, making men’s involvement crucial in creating lasting social change.